The Good of the Church

For the sake of the house of the Lord our God, I will seek your good.
Psalm 122:9

David sought the good of Jerusalem because within it was the tabernacle, the place which the presence of God Himself inhabited.

We should seek the good of the Church because God Himself inhabits her. We should seek the good of our communities because the Church – God’s people and the very vessel of His presence – resides in them.

God cares about peace and unity within His church and within our cities. He expects from His children reverence for the Church because it is the body and bride of Christ. It is the instrument of His redemption and authority in the world.

The Church should be a source of gladness for us because it is the gathering of His people for His glory.

For the sake of God, we must seek the peace, unity, prosperity of the Church. For the sake of the church, we should seek the peace and prosperity of our community and the world.

Sometimes, we struggle to respect and love the Church. We forget, because of her many shortcomings – and because of our many shortcomings – that she is the instrument of God’s work, power, glory, authority, and redemption in this world. She is the vessel in which His presence resides.

She belongs to Christ and should be loved and respected as His body and bride.

We resent the church when we are hurt by her. We lose hope for her when she or a part of her (especially her human leadership) fails. We separate her completely from the world, though she exists in it for its good.
I should remember, too, that as a member and leader in the Church, I have a need for all her members to seek the peace, unity, and prosperity of the Church.

Let’s pray this way:

God renew my love for the universal Church and for my church, because Your presence resides in her. Give me a love for my community because Your church resides in her. Give me a love for the world because You love the world and placed Your Church in it for its good.

Imagine if there were no resentment, anger, hatred toward the Church in your heart or mine ever again. Because she is the body of Christ, we’d work tirelessly for her good and the good of the communities and the world in which our churches reside.

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The Light of the Word

Your word is a lamp to my feet And a light to my path.
Psalm 119:105

The word of God provides guidance and wisdom in a dark, fallen world.

God’s word is righteous – it teaches righteousness. His word promises revival, renewal when we suffer, and He is faithful to keep that promise. He will teach His law, His word, to those who genuinely seek its wisdom. His word is a source of joy, and it has the power to shape who we are.

The psalmist has committed himself forever to God’s word. He sees it as his heritage, his inheritance, the source of his identity. It is a source of joy for him. He clings to it even when his life is in danger, even when he suffers.

I love God’s word, but I’m not sure that my love for it has such depth. If it did, I’d be more obedient. My heart would be more inclined to the things of God. I would be more like Christ and less like the broken sinner I was without Him.

Perhaps you could say the same.

Cling to God’s word as the psalmist does. Let it – let God – define our identity, shape us. Find our joy in it. Cling to it even in suffering and trial.

We too often trust in our own wisdom. When times are difficult, we don’t even look to God’s word. We look to our own wisdom or we give in to fear. We have no direction morally or spiritually. But the truth is that we need God’s guidance because the world is dark and evil. We need His word to show us where the path of righteousness is. We can’t see it on our own.

We need to rely on God’s word, to cling to it in good times and trials, to find our joy and our identity in it. Teach it to our children. Commit ourselves to obey it. Praise Him, seek Him, and wait for Him to teach us His ways.

If we love God’s word as deeply as the psalmist, we will be more obedient. Our hearts will be more inclined to the things of God. We will be more like Christ and less like the broken sinners we were without Him.

By His grace, all of this is possible.

We Need God’s Discipline

I know, O Lord, that Your judgments are righteous, And that in faithfulness You have afflicted me.
Psalm 119:75

I know, God, that if you cause me suffering, it is because you judge righteously, it is because You are faithful.

God created us. We know He is just, righteous, and faithful. We know He is merciful. We know He is kind to us because He loves us. We know He is compassionate. We know His word is worth delighting in and meditating on. We know He takes away our shame. Understanding of His word comes from Him. We know He comforts us in our suffering. When our suffering is the result of discipline, do we turn to Him or away?

We need to remember what we already know.

You and I, we are His to do with as He pleases because He created us. But He is faithful. Therefore I don’t need to be afraid unless I stray from His word.

Remember what you already know. Even if you suffer because God is disciplining you, He still loves, comforts, shows mercy and compassion, removes shame, and provides community and acceptance among His people when we return to obedience to His word.

When He disciplines us, do we turn back or do we blame Him for our suffering as though He doesn’t have the right? That’s just further rebellion against Him.

Don’t resent God’s discipline. Somehow, we have to get past anger against Him for our suffering and learn to accept it joyfully.

The book of Hebrews tells us “All discipline for the moment seems not to be joyful, but sorrowful; yet to those who have been trained by it, afterwards it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness.” (Hebrews 12:11 NASB)

Whether the suffering is because of His discipline or because we are His followers in a fallen world, He will use it to make us more like Christ.

We need to delight in, meditate on, be obedient to His word. We need His mercy, love, and compassion, as well as the community and acceptance of His church.

Obedience, understanding, and faith are the direct results of His grace. Discipline is also a result of His grace. Anything that God uses to transform me into the image of Christ is a direct result of the grace of Christ.

We need God’s discipline.