Tag Archives: prayer

What Makes Prayer Powerful

Elijah was a man with a nature like ours, and he prayed earnestly that it would not rain, and it did not rain on the earth for three years and six months.
James 5:17

We must pray because the prayers of righteous people, by the grace of God, have power to accomplish things. Elijah is our example: he was a man like us, and when he prayed that it would not rain, it didn’t rain for 3 and a half years! Then he prayed again, and it rained.

God is the power behind our prayers. Therefore, rightness with Him is a requirement. He wants us to pray. (It is commanded, expected here.) He wants to do things for us – to grant our requests, to heal us, to forgive us, to restore us – in the context of a right relationship with Him.

If we truly seek to follow Christ, our prayers will have power. Righteousness – rightness with God – ensures that when we pray, we are asking for what God wills. Elijah asked for something outrageous and got it because his will – his request – was aligned with God’s will. This is what makes prayer powerful.

God will answer the prayers of those who are right with Him. He will answer prayers in dramatic ways when those prayers – when those praying – are aligned with His will.

He heals. He forgives. He restores.

Have you lacked faith in God’s answering of prayers? Maybe you haven’t always asked in line with His will. Maybe you have not been righteous. Maybe you have not prayed faithfully as we are commanded and expected by God to do.

He does not answer prayers that are prayed from a place of unrighteousness – when we are not right with Him, when our prayers are not aligned with His will.

We need to pray faithfully and expectantly from a place of rightness with Him.

Ask God to make you righteous, to make you one whose prayers hold power like Elijah’s.

It’s by His grace that He answers prayer at all, for none of us is righteous on his or her own, but only by His grace. Therefore, the power of a righteous man’s prayer ultimately comes from God by His grace.

To be a righteous man, to be a man whose prayers hold power, I need Christ’s grace.

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The Good Gift

If you then, being evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask Him? – Luke 11:13

If an earthly father who is corrupted by sin is capable of giving his child good things, things the child needs, is not God – who is holy, righteous, perfect – infinitely more capable of giving us His Holy Spirit when we ask?

God gives us what we need, specifically the Holy Spirit. He wants us to ask, and He wants us to ask with right motivations from a place of humility and seeking His will first. He is provider. He loves us.

We must ask rightly, with right motives, in humility, not selfishly. We must ask for God’s will. When we ask rightly, God gives us what we request. When we ask rightly, we ask for the right things.

We often don’t ask rightly – with right motives, unselfishly, humbly. We often don’t ask persistently.

When we are asking wrongly, we start to believe that God doesn’t answer prayers, but in truth, the fault lies with us. We don’t trust Him. We don’t ask persistently. We become self-sufficient or we give up on being Christlike.

God help us to walk in Your Spirit, to show us Your glory, to transform us into the image of Christ.

Review | Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God | Timothy Keller

I recently finished Pastor Timothy Keller’s latest book, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God, and wow. What a phenomenal work. It’s got a permanent place in my library, now, folks, and I highly recommend it to each of you.

As a Christian, and especially as a worship pastor, I believe prayer is of utmost importance, but I’ve always struggled with it. That’s why 2014 was the year of prayer for me. I pray everyday, but I made it a personal goal to find the prayer life God had for me.

I read two books last year that had an impact on my prayer life:

I’d recommend them both to you without hesitation, but Keller’s book is the one that’s left the most lasting impression on me.

Keller provides the reader with a deeper understanding of what prayer is scripturally and historically, as well as what it is not. And he gives practical tools that focus your prayers on God, rather than your own needs and wants.

In the couple of weeks since I finished the book, I have applied Keller’s wisdom, and I’ve seen the difference. In all honesty, I’ve experienced God in my prayer time in ways that I never have before.

There’s no magic here. Keller simply points us to Scripture as our source for the power of prayer.