Tag Archives: visual media

Notes from Boot Camp | Visual Media

To those who attended my breakout session on visual media at the BCMD Worship Team Boot Camp on Feb. 25, thank you so much for attending! I hope the day was as much a blessing for you as it was for me. As promised, here are my notes from the session.

  1. Role of technology/Visual Media in a worship setting
    1. To create an environment
      1. Visual Worship Leaders
      2. What is a worship leader?
        1. A worship leader can’t make people worship, and it’s not our responsibility
        2. Two things we can do:
          1. We can and should respond to God with worship.
          2. We can and should speak, sing, play, create, and use technology in such a way that the people we hope to lead receive every opportunity to respond to God with worship.
      3. What is a Visual Worship Leader?
        1. Oversees, curates, prepares the visuals
        2. In a very real sense you shape the direction of the service
        3. It’s your job to help everyone know where they should be:
          1. Congregation: What words am I supposed to sing right now?
          2. Band: What words am I supposed to sing next?
          3. If you don’t go at the appropriate time, you can cause a bit of chaos
        4. At times, you have a greater influence on the environment of worship than anyone else
        5. Choices you make impact the flow and experience of the service in significant ways
        6. Be vigilant, always listening, always watching, always learning
    1. To serve the Word
      1. Four load-bearing walls of Worship Service (Constance Cherry)
        1. Gathering
        2. Word
        3. Table/Response
        4. Sending
      2. The Word is the focus – everything points to it
        1. Message over media
          1. Don’t do something just because it looks cool – does it serve the message?
          2. Example: structure visuals around the sermon
            1. We create graphics for sermon series
            2. Those inform our visuals throughout
    2. Band and pastor can’t do their job without you
    3. Not a job you can do without preparation
  2. General Pointers
    1. Backgrounds
      1. Not too many colors
      2. Not too much motion
      3. You’ve got to be willing to delete stuff that looks cool
      4. Not too many changes
        1. Every song doesn’t have to have a different background
        2. Same goes for slides in the sermon presentation.
          1. Keep the background and use foreground images
    2. Text
      1. legible
        1. common font and size for songs
        2. slightly smaller font size for message
        3. create a style that you think looks good, stand at the back and make sure you can read it.
      2. comprehensible
        1. how much is too much at one time?
          1. less is more
          2. the great serif debate (serif or sans serif)
            1. sans serif all the way baby! (it’s less cluttered and therefore easier to read in a worship setting)
          3. concise idea onscreen – not multiple ideas – specifically in the worship context
            1. I usually shoot for no more than 2-4 lines per slide in a song
            2. 4-6 lines per slide in a sermon presentation
        2. care for orphans and widows (in text)
        3. Punctuation & Phrasing
          1. relax, it’s just poetry
            1. rules of sentence structure don’t necessarily apply
            2. commas and line breaks dictate phrasing (but you don’t have to SHOW the commas)
            3. I don’t include punctuation at the end of a line except for quotes and questions
      3.  Lighting
        1. Use light to define spaces
          1. Example:
            1. Smaller lit area during preaching
            2. Larger one during music
        2. Be conscious of the emotional impact of color and light
          1. DO NOT USE RED
          2. Think about your house lights
            1. Up or down?
        3. Don’t be afraid to go black
  3.  Resources
    1.  Books
      1. An Hour on Sunday: Creating Moments of Transformation and Wonder by Nancy Beach
      2. The Worship Architect: A Blueprint for Designing Culturally Relevant and Biblically Faithful Services by Constance Cherry
    2.  Websites
      1. visualworshiper.com – blog
      2. http://www.sundaymag.tv/lighting-color-theory/ – great article by Camron Ware about the emotional impact of color
      3. lukemcelroy.com – articles
      4. judkossum.wordpress.com – my blog
      5. Visual Media
        1. shiftworship.com
        2. twotp.com

Well, there you have it! If you have any questions, feel free to comment here.

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Visual Worship, Part 3 | Imagery

Lighting and visual media are incredibly useful tools in the hands of the worship leader, producer, and planner.  In part 1 of this blog series, I discussed whether or not these tools are necessary, and in part 2, I wrote about the use of lighting.  Today, I want to talk about the use of imagery in worship – both videos and stills.

For most of us (unless we’re pastoring or leading in larger facilities with a lot of projection capability), this really means presentation backgrounds – the imagery that you show behind song lyrics – with the occasional stand-alone video or still image.

Here are some best practices I’d suggest for backgrounds:

  1. Think about colors. Your service should have a color palette that is established with the use of your stage lighting and graphics. This makes for a visually cohesive whole. Here’s what I don’t mean: everything the same color. Talk about overwhelmingly monotonous! Two to three colors is best – ones that work together well.*  If it looks obnoxious to you, there’s a good chance it will look obnoxious to your congregation.  Learn about color theory if you don’t know it already.  Here’s a great article on the subject by Camron Ware of visualworshiper.com. For sermon series, I’d suggest an ongoing graphical and lighting theme to tie the whole thing together.
  2. Think simple. Stills or motion backgrounds with lots of colors can be garish and can backfire on you if you’re trying to create a cohesive theme.  Too much motion (too fast, too big) can be distracting to say the least.  Simple motion gives the feeling of energy without pulling the congregant away from the lyrics.
  3. Think abstract. With a few exceptions, I generally stay away from recognizable imagery – especially photos or live-action video.  There’s a certain cheese factor to a lot of these type of images, and something easily recognizable can be distracting. Abstract imagery gives a sense of something, a mood, without presenting an object or place to latch on to.  You really only want your congregation to latch onto the words. Close up shots of waving grass, a somewhat blurry sunset through the trees, rippling water – videos like these can be the exceptions because, though they are real things, they are presented in an abstract fashion that makes them better for background use.  A wide shot of a landscape distracts because it’s so easily recognizable.
  4. Think in stages. There are natural phases to your worship service. Use the imagery to help define those stages.** Let’s say the “gathering” (or opening or call to worship) portion of your service consists of an opening song, a welcome, and an opening prayer.  You might use the same background imagery for each of those elements, or at least stay with the same color, then shift to another color or imagery selection with the next stage of the service. Typically in our services, there will be an unbroken string of two to three songs that we will tie together visually in this way.

This is by no means an exhaustive list, but hopefully it’s helpful to you. Please feel free to leave your questions and comments. I look forward to them!

*Regarding lighting, the folks I’m addressing here are those who have very basic lighting systems. The smaller to mid-size church with a simple setup and one person overseeing the musical and visual parts of the worship ministry. Hopefully, if you have a more elaborate lighting system, you have people who really know what to do with it and can move beyond these simple uses.

*Check out Constance Cherry’s book The Worship Architect for more info on this.

Visual Worship, Part 2 | Stage Lighting

As I wrote in part 1 of this blog series, lighting and visual media are not necessities but simply useful tools. Like any tool, to get the right results, we have to use them the right way.  So here are some suggested best practices for using lighting in worship. (These are pretty general. Specifics are outside the scope of this post.)

Define Spaces

One of the most basic functions of stage lighting is to define the space. Suppose your worship venue has a massive stage/platform.  That can lead to distraction, lack of intimacy, and lack of focus.

Use your stage lighting to light only the parts of the platform where the action is happening. If it’s music time, light only the portion of the stage where your band or choir members are standing. When the preaching time comes, don’t be afraid to change the lighting to focus only on the area where the preacher is, effectively removing other parts of the stage from view.

Use the House Lights

Something else not to fear: bringing down the house lights. You have to be careful here because a worship service is a corporate activity. Bringing down the house lights can create a greater sense of intimacy (and increase your ability to define spaces on the platform), and that’s good. However, a more intimate feel can make you forget there are other people in the room.

Corporate worship does not consist of isolated acts of individuals who happen to be in the same room. It is an action of the gathered body of Christ.

Don’t be afraid to bring the house lights down, but teach your people that they come together as one body. Help them remember (or learn for the first time) what corporate worship really is. Find opportunities to bring the lights up during your service so the people can be reminded that it’s not just “Jesus and me.”

Create Transitions

Finally, use lighting to create transitions between sections of the service.  For example, we bring all the stage lights down when we move from music to preaching (except for a few in the back of the stage). This provides a cue for people to sit and makes them aware that we’re moving forward.  It has the added benefit of removing focus from some behind-the-scenes activity (like moving equipment, stands, etc., on the platform.

I’d love to hear your thoughts and questions on these basic tips on stage lighting in worship.

Visual Worship, Part 1 | A Necessity?

We went along for years without the kinds of visuals we use in our worship services today. We read lyrics and notes in our hymnals and didn’t miss what we didn’t have.

But today we have motion backgrounds behind our lyrics on HD screens, we use mini-movies to tell stories that bring to life the ideas we’re expressing in our teaching time. People devote their lives, careers, and ministries to visual worship.

I’m going to spend a few blogs ruminating on the use of visual media in worship, beginning with a pretty basic question: I’m sure we’d miss it if it was gone, but is visual worship a necessity?

Our Job

Our job as worship leaders/pastors is not to get people to worship. That’s a standard you can’t hold yourself to because only God can influence people to worship. And if someone else is holding you to that standard, maybe you need to find a new place to serve. (You’ll probably have to eventually whether you want to or not!)

Our job – or part of it, anyway – is to, as much as it is within our power and with the tools we have available, create an environment that gives our congregations every opportunity to worship. Visual media – like music, staging, lighting – is one of the tools we have at hand. Like those other tools, it’s an imperfect one, but it’s still a useful one.

Light, color, motion, visual story-telling – these things can be used to help people move in a particular direction. So, if used appropriately in a worship setting, I believe they can be used to to help us focus our hearts and minds on God. But their inherent imperfections make this tricky.

By their very nature, visual media can monopolize our attention. They can be too flashy. They can easily become – just as musical performance can – the point of our events.

All that to say, visual media in worship is not a necessity. It’s simply one tool on the worship leader’s belt.

What’s essential is wisdom. Pray to God for the wisdom to use visual media appropriately, not to become caught up in the cool factor, to use it only when, and in ways that, will help your people come to a place where they can focus on the One who is the object of our worship. Be wise so that you don’t fall victim to the lie that, if there are no visuals, it’s not worship.

Otherwise, our Sunday worship just becomes a rock show. And kind of a lame one.